What is changing in work - everything! But not necessarily because of technology.

The third edition of the biannual WORK conference, titled WORK 2017 organised by the Turku Centre for Labour Studies, University of Turku and SWiPE research consortium in Turku, Finland has collected together an impressive multidisciplinary crowd of people interested in the study of work.

Training opportunities with COST-ARKWORK

COST Action on Archaeological practices and knowledge work in the digital environment (ARKWORK) is organising a Training school in Studying Archaeological fieldwork, knowledge production, and the digital environment in Athens, Nov 6-10, 2017.

Encounters of amateurs and professionals with tangible cultural heritage

Friday April 7, 2017 9-11 am @ Engelska Parken, Thunbergsvägen 3, Room 2/K1028

COST-ARKWORK Archaeological practices and knowledge work

COST-ARKWORK is a new network funded by the COST scheme that brings together the multidisciplinary work of researchers of archaeological practices in the field of archaeological knowledge production and use. COST-ARKWORK was launched in November and will run four years until October 2020. 

Beyond interpretivism but where?

What comes after interpretivism, dichotomisation of the social and technological, is sociomaterialism, ANT, activity theory, or something else the answer to the theoretical headache of trying to figure out what happens out there with different types of things, independent of them being something or non-something, or attempting to hold back the lure of making dichotomies, merely something.

When is information work?

Information science researchers and practitioners discuss information activities using a large number of different terms. A concept that often appears in colloquial discussions of information activities but that has received less systematic attention in information science research is that of information work.

All life-events are significant!

Prof. Ian Ruthwen (University of Strathclyde) held an interesting keynote at 2016 edition of the ISIC - Information Behaviour Conference in Zadar, Croatia. He talked about information behaviours (sic!) related to significant life events and made broadly remarks on what is significant in significant life events and how these aspects have possible repercussions on how people deal with information.

Workshop on empowering positive behaviour change in complex food environments

I am glad to be part of the team together with Meena Daivadanam (Nutritional Science, Uppsala University), Åsa Cajander (Department of IT, Uppsala University), my colleague from the DOME consortium, and others,  organising a workshop Empowering positive behaviour change in complex food environments at Uppsala Health Summit.

Conceptions of CoLIS9 and ARKDIS16 conferences

Last week was a tough one but, at the same time, a very successful one. I was organising two conference with my colleagues in Uppsala, the 9th international conference in the Conceptions of Library and Information Science on methods, theories, concepts and conceptions of and in information studies, and the Archaeological Information in the Digital Society 2016, 3rd Centre for Digital Heritage conference organised by the ARKDIS research project.

Documentation, reports, data and the archiving and management of archeological information

Three new articles from the ARKDIS project have come out in the beginning of the summer discussing respectively the archiving and management of archaeological information in Sweden, the paradox of the how archaeological primary research data is considered highly important but only seldom used and properly archived and how archaeological documentation is changing in the digital society. Abstracts and links to the papers can be found below.

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Information Services and Digital Literacy provides an alternative perspective for understanding information services and digital literacy, and argues that a central problem in the age of the social web and the culture of participation is that we do not know the premises of how we know, and how ways of interacting with information affect our actions and their outcomes.

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Taking Health Information Behaviour into Account: implications of a neglected element for success- ful implementation of consumer health technologies on older adults (HIBA) is an Academy of Finland funded research project at Åbo Akademi University.

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ARKDIS project maps the implications and opportunities of the digitalisation of information and information work in the domain of archaeology and to develop and evaluate conceptual and practical methods and procedures for enhancing archaeological information work in the digitalised environment.

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