Publications

Export 163 results:
Author Title [ Type(Asc)] Year
Proceedings Article
I. Huvila, To whom it may concern? The users and uses of digital archaeological information, 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), vol. 10. Dr. Rudolf Habelt GmbH, Berlin, 2007.
I. Huvila and Holmberg, K., Social Capital in Second Life, Internet Research 9.0. Copenhagen, 2008.
I. Holmberg Kim & Huvila and ASIS\&T, The Second Life of Library and Information Science Education: Learning Together Apart, ASIST 2007 Proceedings of the 70th ASIS\&T Annual Meeting Joining Research and Practice: Social Computing and Information Science, vol. 44. p. 537--548, 2007.
K. Uotila, Huvila, I., Lehtonen, H., Wahlsten, J., and Ioannides M, A. N. M. D. F. K., Realtime intrasite documentation from above: the case of balloon-mounted wireless photography, The e-volution of Information Communication Technology in Cultural Heritage. Where Hi-Tech Touches the Past: Risks and Challenges for the 21st Century. Short papers from the joint event CIPA/VAST/EG/EuroMed 2006. Archaeolingua, p. 213--218, 2006.
I. Huvila and Widén-Wulff, G., Perspectives to the classication of information interactions: The Cool and Belkin faceted classication scheme under scrutiny, First Symposium on Information Interaction in Context (IIiX 2006). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Copenhagen, 2006.
I. Huvila, One size fits all in archaeological information work?, International conference Information use in information society (IUIS2006. University of Bratislava, Bratislava, 2006.
G. Widén, Lindström, J., Brännback, M., Huvila, I., and Nyström, A. - G., Mixed Emotions in Active Social Media Use-Fun and Convenient or Shameful and Embarrassing?, iConference 2015 Proceedings. 2015.PDF icon Widen2015.pdf (241.74 KB)
K. Uotila, Huvila, I., Paalassalo, J. - P., Helenius, I., Lindholm, J., Lääperi, M., Puolamäki, L., and Wahlqvist, S., Learning, Access, and Mobility (LAMB) for Cultural Heritage Education, 37th Annual Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) Conference. Williamsburg, Virginia, 2009.
I. Huvila, The Information Condition: Information Resources and Use in Labour, Work and Action, Information Seeking in Context (ISIC). Vilnius, Lithuania, 2008.
I. Huvila, Entä informaatiokirjoitustaito? , Reader- and User-Oriented Communication: National Conference Communication Studies 2007, vol. 152. University of Vaasa, Vaasa, p. 22--27, 2008.
E. Davenport, Ginman, M., Marcoux, Y., Sonnenwald, D., Talja, S., and Vatanen, I., The Concept of the Source in a World of Multiple Channels, Proceedings of the ASIS\&T 2004 Annual Meeting. Information Today, Medford, p. 567--568, 2004.
I. Vatanen, Menozzi, O., Marzio, D. M. L., and Fossataro, D., Archaeology of a Common Sailor? Sea and Seafaring people in the Imperial Rome, SOMA 2005. Proceedings of the IX Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology, Chieti (Italy), 24-26 February 2005, vol. 1739. Archaeopress, p. 231--234, 2008.
I. Huvila, Olsson, M., Faniel, I. M., Dalbello, M., and Dallas, C., Archaeological perspectives in information science, Proc. Assoc. Info. Sci. Tech., vol. 54. pp. 570–573, 2017.PDF icon Huvila2017h.pdf (377.89 KB)
Miscellaneous
I. Huvila, What about creating and organizing?. University of Bor\aa{}s, Bor\aa{}s, 2010.
Journal Article
G. Widén, Ahmad, F., and Huvila, I., Workplace information sharing: A generational approach, Information Research, vol. 22, p. paper isics04, 2017.
I. Huvila, Work and work roles: a context of tasks, Journal of Documentation, vol. 64, pp. 797–815, 2008.PDF icon IstoHuvila_WorkRolesAndTasks_JDOC.pdf (349.92 KB)
I. Huvila, Where does the information come from? Information source use patterns in Wikipedia, Information Research, vol. 15, 2010.
K. Holmberg, Huvila, I., Kronqvist-Berg, M., and Widén-Wulff, G., What is Library 2.0?, Journal of Documentation, vol. 65, pp. 668-681, 2009.
I. Huvila, Holmberg, K., Kronqvist-Berg, M., Nivakoski, O., and Widén, G., What is Librarian 2.0?, Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, vol. 45, pp. 198–205, 2013.PDF icon WhatIsLibrarianPrePrint.pdf (1 MB)
I. Huvila, "We've got a better situation" the Life and Afterlife of Virtual Communities of Google Lively, Journal of Documentation, vol. 71, pp. 526 - 549, 2015.PDF icon IstoHuvila-BetterSituationPreprint.pdf (626.89 KB)
Z. Friberg and Huvila, I., Using object biographies to understand the curation crisis: lessons learned from the museum life of an archaeological collection, Museum Management and Curatorship, vol. 34, pp. 362-382, 2019.PDF icon Friberg2019.pdf (1.76 MB)
I. Huvila, The unbearable lightness of participating? Revisiting the discourses of 'participation' in archival literature, Journal of Documentation, vol. 71, pp. 358–386, 2015.PDF icon IstoHuvilaUnbearableLightnessPreprint.pdf (362.89 KB)
I. Huvila, The Unbearable Complexity of Documenting Intellectual Processes: Paradata and Virtual Cultural Heritage Visualisation, Human IT, vol. 12, pp. 97-110, 2012.

Pages

Archaeology and Archaeological Information in the Digital Society shows how the digitization of archaeological information, tools and workflows, and their interplay with both old and new non-digital practices throughout the archaeological information process, affect the outcomes of archaeological work, and in the end, our general understanding of the human past.

Read more

Taking Health Information Behaviour into Account: implications of a neglected element for success- ful implementation of consumer health technologies on older adults (HIBA) is an Academy of Finland funded research project at Åbo Akademi University.

Read more

Sheds new light on the potential of extra-academic knowledge-making as a contribution in formations of knowledge throughout society, explores extra-academic knowledge as a useful resource in academy, policy development, evidence based practices, and innovation, and focuses on the informational dimensions, stemming from and grounded in an informationscience perspective, which provides the means to address practical information-related issues throughout knowledge-making processes.

Read more