conferences

Call for Papers POEM Opening Conference: Participatory Memory Practices: Connectivities, Empowerment, and Recognition of Cultural Heritages in Mediatized Memory Ecologies (DL Sept 15, 2018)

Diverging forces across European societies - most visible in both the contemporary nationalist movements and Islamist radicalization - place particular relevance on social and cultural inclusion. Culture may cultivate both integrative and disruptive forces; in this light heritage experts, policy makers, social entrepreneurs, and other facilitators are seeking to establish inclusive memory politics for envisioning possible futures of how we should remember our past in Europe.

What is changing in work - everything! But not necessarily because of technology.

The third edition of the biannual WORK conference, titled WORK 2017 organised by the Turku Centre for Labour Studies, University of Turku and SWiPE research consortium in Turku, Finland has collected together an impressive multidisciplinary crowd of people interested in the study of work.

Encounters of amateurs and professionals with tangible cultural heritage

Friday April 7, 2017 9-11 am @ Engelska Parken, Thunbergsvägen 3, Room 2/K1028

Beyond interpretivism but where?

What comes after interpretivism, dichotomisation of the social and technological, is sociomaterialism, ANT, activity theory, or something else the answer to the theoretical headache of trying to figure out what happens out there with different types of things, independent of them being something or non-something, or attempting to hold back the lure of making dichotomies, merely something.

All life-events are significant!

Prof. Ian Ruthwen (University of Strathclyde) held an interesting keynote at 2016 edition of the ISIC - Information Behaviour Conference in Zadar, Croatia. He talked about information behaviours (sic!) related to significant life events and made broadly remarks on what is significant in significant life events and how these aspects have possible repercussions on how people deal with information.

Workshop on empowering positive behaviour change in complex food environments

I am glad to be part of the team together with Meena Daivadanam (Nutritional Science, Uppsala University), Åsa Cajander (Department of IT, Uppsala University), my colleague from the DOME consortium, and others,  organising a workshop Empowering positive behaviour change in complex food environments at Uppsala Health Summit.

What technology does to us?

Many of the discussions at this year's edition of the Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology CAA 2016 conference held earlier this week in Oslo were directly or somewhat less directly related to anxieties (and occasional optimism) about the impact of various types of technologies (and social arrangements related to technologies) on archaeological (information) work and practices.

Room for cross-breeding information and knowledge communities

I have been planning for some time to participate  in the Organisational learning, knowledge and capabilities (OLKC) conference and finally managed to do it in the 2015 edition of the event organised at the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore in Milan, Italy.

The problem is to articulate for whom and how

The Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology conference was held this year  in Siena. Conference had gathered approximately 500 delegates and a very impressive number of papers, posters and roundtables. The book of abstracts was massive and reminded of proceedings volumes of the same conference from ten years ago.

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Archaeology and Archaeological Information in the Digital Society shows how the digitization of archaeological information, tools and workflows, and their interplay with both old and new non-digital practices throughout the archaeological information process, affect the outcomes of archaeological work, and in the end, our general understanding of the human past.

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Taking Health Information Behaviour into Account: implications of a neglected element for success- ful implementation of consumer health technologies on older adults (HIBA) is an Academy of Finland funded research project at Åbo Akademi University.

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ARKDIS project maps the implications and opportunities of the digitalisation of information and information work in the domain of archaeology and to develop and evaluate conceptual and practical methods and procedures for enhancing archaeological information work in the digitalised environment.

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